Daredevil

The Overlord

Well-Known Member
Now that the Daredevil Movie Rights are back at Marvel, what should Marvel do with them? What kind of Daredevil Movie would you like to see, what story should they adapt? Who should they cast as DD, the villains and the supporting cast?
 

Zombipanda

My Boom-Boom's mostly gay
Nicolas Winding Refn's Daredevil.

Set in a New York that resembles a pastiche of 70's gritty crime movies.

Ryan Gosling as Matt Murdoch
Brit Marling as Karen Page
Paul Dano as Foggy Nelson
Philip Seymour Hoffman as Ben Urich
Michael Chiklis (RIP James Gandolfini) as Wilson Fisk
Michael Fassbender as Bullseye
 
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ProjectX2

Don't expect me to take you with me when I go to s
I still want Joe Carnahan's Daredevil. Or maybe a Marvel Knights TV show.
 

DIrishB

The Timeline Guy
Now that the Daredevil Movie Rights are back at Marvel, what should Marvel do with them? What kind of Daredevil Movie would you like to see, what story should they adapt? Who should they cast as DD, the villains and the supporting cast?

Personally I'd love to see them make an attempt at a Daredevil TV series set in the MCU. Combining the courtroom drama with superhero exploits would be an original and interesting combination, and could lead to some great storylines in terms of Murdock examining his vigilante life in regards to the law. Plus the general public loooooooooooves crime shows. You'd think the genre would be tapped out after 25 years of Law & Order, its dozen spin offs, and uncountable knock offs, but no, apparently not. At least adding a blind guy in tights traipsing around rooftops at night would be a new twist on the formula.

Plus, I don't really think a DD film would allow for enough exploration of his life as a lawyer versus superhero. Ideally the majority of the show would focus on his life as a lawyer, dealing with criminals, etc, and allow for some of the superhero stuff. Think the Daredevil stuff would be an interesting way of amping up the pacing of the court proceedings. Plus a show would allow his supporting cast to be more fleshed out and explored, as opposed to just a few minutes onscreen like a movie would allow for.
 

The Overlord

Well-Known Member
Personally I'd love to see them make an attempt at a Daredevil TV series set in the MCU. Combining the courtroom drama with superhero exploits would be an original and interesting combination, and could lead to some great storylines in terms of Murdock examining his vigilante life in regards to the law. Plus the general public loooooooooooves crime shows. You'd think the genre would be tapped out after 25 years of Law & Order, its dozen spin offs, and uncountable knock offs, but no, apparently not. At least adding a blind guy in tights traipsing around rooftops at night would be a new twist on the formula.

Plus, I don't really think a DD film would allow for enough exploration of his life as a lawyer versus superhero. Ideally the majority of the show would focus on his life as a lawyer, dealing with criminals, etc, and allow for some of the superhero stuff. Think the Daredevil stuff would be an interesting way of amping up the pacing of the court proceedings. Plus a show would allow his supporting cast to be more fleshed out and explored, as opposed to just a few minutes onscreen like a movie would allow for.

My only concern with that is, can they capture Daredevil's over the top fighting style on a TV budget? Also would they show his super senses on the TV show or would he just describe it? Now which DD villains would work on a TV budget, because I assume like the Green Arrow, they may want to use as many villains as possible to pad the episode count and give DD different things to do other then fight Bullseye every week.

Frankly I have not been impressed with most live action superhero TV shows, Green Arrow is likely the best one and its okay.
 

E

Moderator
Excelsior Club
Personally I'd love to see them make an attempt at a Daredevil TV series set in the MCU. Combining the courtroom drama with superhero exploits would be an original and interesting combination, and could lead to some great storylines in terms of Murdock examining his vigilante life in regards to the law. Plus the general public loooooooooooves crime shows. You'd think the genre would be tapped out after 25 years of Law & Order, its dozen spin offs, and uncountable knock offs, but no, apparently not. At least adding a blind guy in tights traipsing around rooftops at night would be a new twist on the formula.

That would be really great. [thread=10876]I made a thread a while back[/thread] about how well thought out the character is and I think all of the contradictions in his life make for an amazing story. I'd love to see a TV series of it, even if it was just rehashing the Bendis/Brubaker runs.
 

The Overlord

Well-Known Member
That would be really great. [thread=10876]I made a thread a while back[/thread] about how well thought out the character is and I think all of the contradictions in his life make for an amazing story. I'd love to see a TV series of it, even if it was just rehashing the Bendis/Brubaker runs.

The thing is though, the Bendis and Brubaker runs are built on previous continuity and really don't work without it. Daredevil's secret identity getting out means more if we have to care about Matt Murdock, Daredevil was around for decades in comics before his secret identity was revealed, the readers had a reason to care about Matt before his ID got out, likewise the story in Underboss doesn't have quite the same impact if it happens in the first season, before Kingpin is really built up in regards to his rivalry with Matt Murdock.

It seems like they would need a couple of seasons to go by, before they can adapt the Bendis stuff. Well in a first season you can adapt some the Frank Miller stories, tell some original stories and do some world building, as well as setting up the characters.
 

DIrishB

The Timeline Guy
Shouldn't you all be gushing over my idea?

What idea?

My only concern with that is, can they capture Daredevil's over the top fighting style on a TV budget? Also would they show his super senses on the TV show or would he just describe it? Now which DD villains would work on a TV budget, because I assume like the Green Arrow, they may want to use as many villains as possible to pad the episode count and give DD different things to do other then fight Bullseye every week.

Have you seen the trailers for Agents of SHIELD? Marvel doesn't have to worry about a small budget. Plus DD's fighting style can easily be handled through fight choreography and wire work, mostly, neither of which is prohibitively expensive.

As for his super senses, that'd require pretty basic special effects, using actual camera shots overdone with the "echo effect", again pretty simple.

As for villains, I'd prefer to see a slow build up to the major villains. For the first episode or two cover Matt taking on the Daredevil persona, and battling lower level criminals which eventually lead him to piece together a new power has arisen in the criminal underworld, obviously Kingpin (since Marvel owns the TV rights to that character, and not Sony--who may have the film rights still, not sure), that allows Marvel to still introduce characters to their MCU universe by doing so through TV. Later a series of strange murders will lead to Bullseye's introduction. Neither of those characters require extensive or extensive special effects, so they're easily handled. I'm not super familiar with DD's rogues gallery so perhaps there are some who'd require some effects, but again I doubt any would be prohibitively expensive in the effects dept.

I think it's best to space out the big bads and focus on regular street crime figures every few episodes while building up those bigger villains in the background until their actual appearances. That'll also help build up more suspense and mystery surrounding those characters before their introduction on the show.

Frankly I have not been impressed with most live action superhero TV shows, Green Arrow is likely the best one and its okay.

I haven't even seen Arrow, but I'd agree. I do hope that changes with SHIELD, and think it will (though that's more focused on the normal humans than superheroes).

However, Daredevil is probably the most well known Marvel property that lends itself well to television. It won't require crazy expensive special effects, and the subject matter in involving lawyers, courtrooms, and vigilantism would tailor an ongoing TV show quite well. If Marvel is to do a second TV show set in the MCU, that seems like the perfect choice, and will allow them to explore an aspect of the MCU not seen in the films (law and street level crime).

That would be really great. I made a thread a while back about how well thought out the character is and I think all of the contradictions in his life make for an amazing story. I'd love to see a TV series of it, even if it was just rehashing the Bendis/Brubaker runs.

Yeah, I'm a completely un-humble genius in my own mind.
 
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Zombipanda

My Boom-Boom's mostly gay
I'm warming a bit to the idea of a Daredevil series, though I'd draw more from the soapier legal dramas like The Practice than procedurals like Law and Order. I just think characterization would have to be at the core of it.

And Overlord is absolutely right. The secret identity revelation stuff is more the climax you build to over the course of the entire season. It's where everything starts to fall apart and presumably sets up a closure to the overall story.

I'm picturing a cable television series with a definitive, closed circuit run, similar in style to the polish of Breaking Bad. I'd roughly see it like this (and bear in mind, I haven't read any Daredevil comics in years, so my memories of the character and the stories are pretty foggy).

The first season sets up the principal thematic conflict that will drive the entire series and establishes the supporting cast. Murdoch's a dude who's night-time business, on the surface at least, contradicts the job he's devoted his life to. He's a defense attorney, who runs around in a mask at night and ties up crooks for the prosecution. And while things aren't cut black and white from the start, we throw him into a setting where we can at least sympathize with the contradictions in his life. It's a city that's rife with crime and corruption, years of violent gang warfare having led to a consolidation of the underworld by a man calling himself the Kingpin. The DA and the bulk of the police force are under his thumb and the majority of New Yorkers are more or less complacent that this consolidation has created a relative peace. Sure, the government and police force may be crooked to the core but there aren't mobsters turning the streets into their personal battlefield and the violence that does happen is mostly contained to Hell's Kitchen. And Matt Murdoch's intentions are somewhat aligned with Daredevil's. As Daredevil, his intention is to push these crooks out in the open where the public can see, so the DA is forced to prosecute. Matt Murdoch's clients are typically victims of the system: crooks used as scapegoats for the Kingpin's activities, victims of police brutalityon trumped up charges, small business owners who have their businesses seize or licenses revoked for standing up to the extortion schemes of crooked politicians.

We build a cast around him. Foggy Nelson, the bumbling and slightly incompetent junior partner to Matt. Karen Page, the naive, doe eyed secretary. Ben Urich, the one reporter with enough integrity to pursue the Kingpin. Colleen Wing, Matt's investigator on retainer. And in a minor role, we have Misty Knight, as one of the few good cops on the force. In a recurring antagonistic role, we have Ox, Fancy Dan, and Montana, who serve as the Kingpin's key enforcers.

Daredevil doesn't have a lot of villains. Those that aren't complete goofballs like robot-men and purple psychics and stilt guys tend to be assassins, so we dole them out sparingly. At the start, Daredevil is presented more or less as this force of nature. We'll peel the skin back more as the seasons go on, but at the start, he's this tornado ripping through the underworld, not the central character so much as the initiating force in the dramas of the law firm and friends.

I'm picturing five or six seasons. Touching on Miller's arc is a must, as are elements of Bendis and Bru's runs. Bullseye and the introduction of the Hand in the second season, the introduction of Elektra and the consequent love triangle between her, Matt, and Karen. Punisher in the third, throwing the actions and consequences of DD's lifestyle into juxtaposition. Foggy taking more and more of the law firm's burden on his shoulders as Matt sinks further into his vigilante identity. Karen's descent into addiction, the Kingpin's fall, and the Hand's ascendency. The resumption of blood on the streets as guys like the Owl and Hammerhead move into the power vacuum left behind by Kingpin's fall in season four. Throw Typhoid Mary into the mix there, maybe. Then the last season is Daredevil exposed, the fall from grace, the piper calling, and prices paid for the consequences of his actions, the revenge of the Kingpin, and all those old villains coming out of the woodwork for a shot at Murdoch and his family.
 

DIrishB

The Timeline Guy
I'm warming a bit to the idea of a Daredevil series, though I'd draw more from the soapier legal dramas like The Practice than procedurals like Law and Order. I just think characterization would have to be at the core of it.

And Overlord is absolutely right. The secret identity revelation stuff is more the climax you build to over the course of the entire season. It's where everything starts to fall apart and presumably sets up a closure to the overall story.

I'm picturing a cable television series with a definitive, closed circuit run, similar in style to the polish of Breaking Bad. I'd roughly see it like this (and bear in mind, I haven't read any Daredevil comics in years, so my memories of the character and the stories are pretty foggy).

Heh.

The first season sets up the principal thematic conflict that will drive the entire series and establishes the supporting cast. Murdoch's a dude who's night-time business, on the surface at least, contradicts the job he's devoted his life to. He's a defense attorney, who runs around in a mask at night and ties up crooks for the prosecution. And while things aren't cut black and white from the start, we throw him into a setting where we can at least sympathize with the contradictions in his life. It's a city that's rife with crime and corruption, years of violent gang warfare having led to a consolidation of the underworld by a man calling himself the Kingpin. The DA and the bulk of the police force are under his thumb and the majority of New Yorkers are more or less complacent that this consolidation has created a relative peace. Sure, the government and police force may be crooked to the core but there aren't mobsters turning the streets into their personal battlefield and the violence that does happen is mostly contained to Hell's Kitchen. And Matt Murdoch's intentions are somewhat aligned with Daredevil's. As Daredevil, his intention is to push these crooks out in the open where the public can see, so the DA is forced to prosecute. Matt Murdoch's clients are typically victims of the system: crooks used as scapegoats for the Kingpin's activities, victims of police brutalityon trumped up charges, small business owners who have their businesses seize or licenses revoked for standing up to the extortion schemes of crooked politicians.

We build a cast around him. Foggy Nelson, the bumbling and slightly incompetent junior partner to Matt. Karen Page, the naive, doe eyed secretary. Ben Urich, the one reporter with enough integrity to pursue the Kingpin. Colleen Wing, Matt's investigator on retainer. And in a minor role, we have Misty Knight, as one of the few good cops on the force. In a recurring antagonistic role, we have Ox, Fancy Dan, and Montana, who serve as the Kingpin's key enforcers.

Daredevil doesn't have a lot of villains. Those that aren't complete goofballs like robot-men and purple psychics and stilt guys tend to be assassins, so we dole them out sparingly. At the start, Daredevil is presented more or less as this force of nature. We'll peel the skin back more as the seasons go on, but at the start, he's this tornado ripping through the underworld, not the central character so much as the initiating force in the dramas of the law firm and friends.

I'm picturing five or six seasons. Touching on Miller's arc is a must, as are elements of Bendis and Bru's runs. Bullseye and the introduction of the Hand in the second season, the introduction of Elektra and the consequent love triangle between her, Matt, and Karen. Punisher in the third, throwing the actions and consequences of DD's lifestyle into juxtaposition. Foggy taking more and more of the law firm's burden on his shoulders as Matt sinks further into his vigilante identity. Karen's descent into addiction, the Kingpin's fall, and the Hand's ascendency. The resumption of blood on the streets as guys like the Owl and Hammerhead move into the power vacuum left behind by Kingpin's fall in season four. Throw Typhoid Mary into the mix there, maybe. Then the last season is Daredevil exposed, the fall from grace, the piper calling, and prices paid for the consequences of his actions, the revenge of the Kingpin, and all those old villains coming out of the woodwork for a shot at Murdoch and his family.

This. Absolutely perfect.

I do think it'd work better and allow for a more realistic and gritty approach by airing on a cable network, but with Disney owning Marvel if it were to happen it'd likely air on a Disney owned channel, most likely ABC since that's one of the major networks and would get the most viewers. It could air on a different ABC owned cable station, but the only one I can think of off the top of my head is ABC Family, and it certainly wouldn't fit the pastiche of that network's shows. However, a 9 or 10pm airing time on ABC itself could work well for it, and allow for the slightly more adult atmosphere the show would require if done right. It'd also be smart to air it following Agents of SHIELD to give ABC presumed ownership of male viewers 18-49 (their beloved demographic) on its airing night, a Marvel block, if you will.

But it'd also be smart to go with the major network not only because of the higher ratings/viewership, but the budget allotted by the studio. Given Marvel's track record at the box office, in addition to Agents of SHIELD's likely massive ratings and connected high ad revenue earnings (we'll know for sure in a month and a half, and cross the T's and dot the I's come May next year to measure viewer drop off over the course of the season), I'd bet ABC would be happy to pony up a considerable budget to bring another Marvel property to the small screen.

But your pitch was perfect. And you're right, the comparison to The Practice works much better than Law & Order, though I would like to see a certain amount of procedural elements added to it, centered around Colleen Wing, as you mentioned. That mix of courtroom drama, investigative procedural, and superhero action would make for a perfectly unique and standout show.

Now the hard part is the costume design. Hopefully something very different than that weird, leather, German BDSM-reminiscent costume Affleck was stuck with in the film. Obviously the simple red tights aren't going to work well on film, either, and certainly not the old school yellow and red. While I have absolutely no ideas regarding that, I would like to see the costume slightly evolve over the course of the season. Not just for aesthetic or fashion purposes, but practical and logical additions or changes based on the villains he encounters.
 
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The Overlord

Well-Known Member
Regarding Daredevil's Rogues Gallery, its bigger then one would think, here is a couple of lists of DD's rogues gallery:

http://www.rapsheet.co.uk/rapsheetmain/Daredevil.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Daredevil_enemies

Plus Green Arrow has a even smaller rogues gallery then DD and they just pulled out the most obscure villains around and give them episodes, like Dodger and China White, characters who I never heard of before they appeared on screen or they use C-list Batman villains like Firefly.

DD's rogues gallery is a mixed bag, you got great villains like Bullseye, Kingpin, Typhoid Mary, the Hand, etc and you got a lot of lame villains like Leap-Frog, Stilt-Man and Matador and you have some villains in the middle, good to okay villains, who may get a good story once and while.

I actually like Purple Man and I don't think he is been a goofball since appeared in the Alias comics, which presented him as a psychotic rapist and serial killer who abuses his mind control power to the furthest extremist. He is actually pretty creepy in that comic, whether he works in a DD TV series is a bit debatable, but he is far less goofy then Stilt-Man. I also think, while he is somewhat over the top, so are Bullseye (a guy who runs around NYC killing people with paper clips) or the Hand (an evil demon worshiping cult that can bring back the dead).

I think Gladiator (Melvin Potter) is a must, because he is interesting, yet underrated character. He started out as a villain and became a member of DD's supporting. He is a somewhat more realistic take on a mentally ill character, his madness has a particular method (psychotic delusions of being an actual Roman gladiator) and once he is cured of his mental illness through drugs and therapy, he is horrified at what he did while in a psychotic state. It also interesting to have a villain actually go straight and went to be a better person.

Mr. Fear is kinda of a tough one, one of the hand he is one of DD's more personal villains, having a grudge against Matt Murdock before knowing he was DD, which is the opposite of what most villains react towards to Matt and he is one of the major villains in Brubaker's run, but on the other hand, he may be seen as a Scarecrow rip off, even though I am pretty sure he used the fear gas gimmick before Scarecrow did, though that may not matter to the general public. He's not a truly shameless rip off, like Jester is, where Stan Lee ripped off the Joker and put him in a DD comic.

You can also do something something the Marvel movies have done, take the basics of a character and change everything else about them. For example, Ann Nocenti introduced the Wildboys in her run, a pair of street punks who caused trouble, you can expand that to an entire street gang named the Wildboys, a group that works at the bottom of the criminal food chain, being the ones who actually sell the drugs on the street for example.

I kinda like Bushwacker and Mr. Hyde, but they may be tricky to do on TV budget, though I do like the story where Matt has to defend Mr. Hyde for one particular crime he didn't commit.

There are also tons of stories where DD does just fights normal criminals, his origin story involves him going after a mid level gangster named the Fixer who murdered his dad, there was an interesting story from the Miller era where Punisher was targeting a mid level drug lord who Matt represented in court, which was an interesting contrast on those characters viewed the justice system and the story where DD fought 100 Yakuza members was really good.

Really DD is the kind character, where you can tell great stories of him fighting super villains or just regular criminals, you could tell some interesting stories with some of DD's B-list villains, but the only one who I think is a must have is Gladiator.
 

Zombipanda

My Boom-Boom's mostly gay
I do think it'd work better and allow for a more realistic and gritty approach by airing on a cable network, but with Disney owning Marvel if it were to happen it'd likely air on a Disney owned channel, most likely ABC since that's one of the major networks and would get the most viewers. It could air on a different ABC owned cable station, but the only one I can think of off the top of my head is ABC Family, and it certainly wouldn't fit the pastiche of that network's shows. However, a 9 or 10pm airing time on ABC itself could work well for it, and allow for the slightly more adult atmosphere the show would require if done right. It'd also be smart to air it following Agents of SHIELD to give ABC presumed ownership of male viewers 18-49 (their beloved demographic) on its airing night, a Marvel block, if you will.

;) Does anyone in the younger half of that demographic even watch TV on networks anymore?

DIrishB said:
But it'd also be smart to go with the major network not only because of the higher ratings/viewership, but the budget allotted by the studio. Given Marvel's track record at the box office, in addition to Agents of SHIELD's likely massive ratings and connected high ad revenue earnings (we'll know for sure in a month and a half, and cross the T's and dot the I's come May next year to measure viewer drop off over the course of the season), I'd bet ABC would be happy to pony up a considerable budget to bring another Marvel property to the small screen.

I'm not sure you're right about budget restraints being looser, on average, for network television as opposed to cable TV. The cable networks that produce original programming tend to spring for high production and talent (see Breaking Bad, The Walking Dead, Mad Men, Nip/Tuck, The Shield, Sons of Anarchy), while networks tend to focus more on lower budget procedurals and reality shows. There was a bubble of continuity-heavy big budget episodic series following the success of Lost and while they do undertake a couple of those projects a year, they're clearly a risky venture. It's easier to keep an audience with a series where you can jump into an episode without prior knowledge and without having missed the last week's ep. Granted, ABC's gambling on SHIELD and if it's a success, they could definitely be looking to more Marvel properties as possible home runs with built-in audiences. But you're absolutely right. As much as I'd like to see a Daredevil series on FX or AMC or even HBO, there's slim to none chance Disney would give it a chance anywhere but on ABC.

DIrishB said:
But your pitch was perfect. And you're right, the comparison to The Practice works much better than Law & Order, though I would like to see a certain amount of procedural elements added to it, centered around Colleen Wing, as you mentioned. That mix of courtroom drama, investigative procedural, and superhero action would make for a perfectly unique and standout show.

Don't get me wrong, I'd definitely put in elements of the process of investigation and courtroom drama. My use of the term procedural was probably wrong though. I meant the term procedural as a series where the process of the investigation and the case is the plot, as opposed to a character drama, where the case is a vehicle for character-based stories.

And funny you should mention Colleen. I'd see her as the potential breakout star. A fantastically fun character to write, dryly sardonic but soft-spoken badass who could teach Matt a lot if he were willing to listen. ;) I could pitch an action-comedy Heroes for Hire spin-off with her and Misty that I'd kill to write.

DIrishB said:
Now the hard part is the costume design. Hopefully something very different than that weird, leather, German BDSM-reminiscent costume Affleck was stuck with in the film. Obviously the simple red tights aren't going to work well on film, either, and certainly not the old school yellow and red. While I have absolutely no ideas regarding that, I would like to see the costume slightly evolve over the course of the season. Not just for aesthetic or fashion purposes, but practical and logical additions or changes based on the villains he encounters.

I'd actually go the fetishwear route. Murdoch has his suit tailored at a specialty fetish tailor with the intent of creating a costume that can take some punishment and be menacing only to quickly discover it's ill-suited for his line of work (and potentially setting up a means by which Kingpin can pursue his identity) ;) but I doubt that's a sub-plot that would sit well with ABC.

Plus Green Arrow has a even smaller rogues gallery then DD and they just pulled out the most obscure villains around and give them episodes, like Dodger and China White, characters who I never heard of before they appeared on screen or they use C-list Batman villains like Firefly.

AFAIK, China White only appeared in Jock and Andy Diggle's fantastic GA: Year One series where she was a cocaine queenpin (hence the name) using the island Ollie crashed on as a manufacturing base.

[/QUOTE=The Overlord]I actually like Purple Man and I don't think he is been a goofball since appeared in the Alias comics, which presented him as a psychotic rapist and serial killer who abuses his mind control power to the furthest extremist. He is actually pretty creepy in that comic, whether he works in a DD TV series is a bit debatable, but he is far less goofy then Stilt-Man.[/QUOTE]

I could definitely see Purple Man working as an adversary.

The Overlord said:
Really DD is the kind character, where you can tell great stories of him fighting super villains or just regular criminals, you could tell some interesting stories with some of DD's B-list villains, but the only one who I think is a must have is Gladiator.

:shock: Really? The only must have is the dude who's convinced that he's a gladiator from ancient Rome?
 

The Overlord

Well-Known Member
I could definitely see Purple Man working as an adversary.



:shock: Really? The only must have is the dude who's convinced that he's a gladiator from ancient Rome?

Of the B-list DD villains, he is likely the biggest must have.

Daredevil's rogues gallery is divided into 3 tiers:

A-list villains: Kingpin, Bullseye, Elektra when she was at odds with DD, Typhoid Mary, the Hand.
All the A-list villains are must haves.

B-list villains: Gladiator, Mr. Fear, Mr. Hyde, Bullet, Bushwacker, Wild Boys, Purple Man, Owl
These guys can be make for good stories, but they are not as necessary as the A-list guys.

C-list villains: Stilt-Man, Jester, Matador, Leap-Frog.
These guys are pretty lame and are best not being used or being used as comic relief, except for Stilt-Man, who is too expensive for a throw away joke.

Of the B-list villains, I do think Gladiator is the most important one, for a couple reasons: He is really the only villain with a character arc, going from a dangerous psychotic into a harmless and friendly citizen. I also think it somewhat validates DD's mission if one of his villains actually reforms, making Hell's Kitchen better takes more then just fist a cuffs. Having a villain reform brings a little needed optimism to DD's world, it shows people can change and that there is good in most people. Having the criminal element trying to drag Gladiator back into crime could be tragic, that was the basis of one Bendis' arcs.

Plus I think a big psychotic guy who attacks people with buzz saws because he thinks he actually is a gladiator, would scary for the people getting attacked.
 
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