DC's Darwyn Cooke's Will Eisner's The Spirit

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Langsta

Well-Known Member
I looked around for a thread on this, but couldn't find one (I went to the search engine, I looked through the General DC Comics section, I went to the General Comics section....).

Anyways, I know this comic is almost two years old, and the first volume has been released as a TPB, but I've only just now become interested in it, with the upcoming movie and all that. I like Darwyn Cooke's artwork, I liked DC: New Frontier, but I haven't read any of the old Spirit comics, I've only read about them. Has anybody read Cooke's series? Is it any good? I heard that he set it in modern times, which is odd since the comic he did right before it - New Frontier - was an homage set in the exact time periods in which each character first appeared. Cooke's artwork for The Spirit looks great, and I was interested to hear that the Octopus is working with Saddam Hussein and is the leader of an international terrorist organization called "the Octagon." Again, I haven't read the old comics, but I thought the Spirit usually only fights in his own city? And now I'm hearing that in Cooke's book he helps bring down Saddam Hussein? It sounds like there are lots of changes from Will Eisner's version....I can see why Cooke would want to get rid of the obvious stereotype-features that Ebony White has, but how much of the change from Eisner's book to this book was unnecessary?

Is the book any good, and should I pick it up (I'm not planning on reading any reprints of the original Spirit comic, if there are any)?
 

ProjectX2

Don't expect me to take you with me when I go to s
I thought it was great. Very easy to get into. Each issue is basically self contained. The writing is great and the art suits it perfectly. I recommend it though I haven't read the stuff after Cooke left. I have no interest without him.
 

Langsta

Well-Known Member
I thought it was great. Very easy to get into. Each issue is basically self contained. The writing is great and the art suits it perfectly. I recommend it though I haven't read the stuff after Cooke left. I have no interest without him.
Thanks. I guess I'll get it then.
 

E

Moderator
Excelsior Club
What Proj said. I have the first collection in hardcover but haven't finished it yet. It's smart and funny and very enjoyable.
 

J. Agamemnon

Well-Known Member
I don't know much about cooke's version of the Spirit but Eisner's had quite a bit of racial undertones. I bought the tpb at wizard world last year at I had a hard time finishing it. All I can say is it fits within the era it was written and if Millers movie version is far different from the original I'd say it was for the best.
 

E

Moderator
Excelsior Club
I don't know much about cooke's version of the Spirit but Eisner's had quite a bit of racial undertones. I bought the tpb at wizard world last year at I had a hard time finishing it. All I can say is it fits within the era it was written and if Millers movie version is far different from the original I'd say it was for the best.
Interesting. Please explain.

I just finished the first collection by Cooke (I think it covers the first 7 issues) and it was great. The story about the blue meteor was a little kooky but overall it was fantastic. It's one of those books that anyone could pick up at any time at any given issue and not miss a thing.
 

Langsta

Well-Known Member
Interesting. Please explain.
Well, like J. Agamemnon said, it fit within the era it was written. I mean, the most obvious example from the strip is Ebony White. Look at his name. And he originally had eccentuated lips, resembling something out of blackface. And from what I've gathered, he was portrayed almost as a "servant"-type with no education, escorting The Spirit around in a taxi.

But most African-American groups weren't really offended by the character, some going so far as to call him a "breakthrough" for modern fiction. Eisner himself admitted to consciously portraying him as a stereotypical black person.

I heard a rumor that the Octopus in Miller's film was going to be an adult Ebony White. Like Dick Grayson becoming the Joker in Miller's Dark Knight continuity.
 
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J. Agamemnon

Well-Known Member
I'm not going to blatantly say Eisners version was outright racist, but it does give off racial sterotypes and vibes that COULD be considered racist. I have not read Cookes version, I'm sure I'd like it. As for Eisner's version, I still have the tpb and give it to people for laughs and see what they think. Every now and then I'll find a person who's skimmed through or read it once before and felt the same as me.

My only thought is if Miller wanted to make a faithful adaptation, Jackson would have to don some think red lips and rosy cheeks. I'm sure Jackson would have said something like, "I hope you burn in Hell!" and then take the paycheck because there is hardly a movie he doesn't accept.
 

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