road trip tips.

Void.M

Well-Known Member
Me and my cousins are planing a road trip for the summer .

So i was wondering if you guys have anytips for a road trip first timer.


Like what id need,what to look out for etc.
 

Lynx

Well-Known Member
Don't take back roads.

Don't ask for directions in the middle of nowhere.

Always make sure you have plenty of gas.

If you need to crash somewhere, go to a respectable hotel chain or a relative/friend's house. Never sleep on the side of the road in your car either.

Plan your trip. Make sure to bring plenty of money.

Bring a week to two weeks worth of clothing, and make sure to stop at a hotel with a wash room every week.

Bring snacks and drinks to munch on in the car.

Don't live off of fast food. Stop at a proper restaurant every so often (Even a Denny's or IHOP is better than McDonald's) otherwise prepare to be sick.
 

Fredrik Martinsson

Formerly known as Ultimate Warrior
Don't spend the night in any haunted mansions or camp near a lake where many people have been mysteriously murdered.
 

Planet-man

Well-Known Member
Gothamite and I and some of our respective friends are trying to go Eurorailing this summer. Any tips for that too?
 

Seldes Katne

Site mom
Leave a general list of expected stops, or at least the expected arrival time at a final destination, with someone trustworthy at home. Admittedly, you may not make those stops at exactly those times, but it's a good idea to make sure someone knows where you're supposed to be at least part of the time. Make sure that person has the names and phone numbers of everyone in the party. Call them if there are any major changes in your trip.

When you arrive, you might want to call home and leave the number of the hotel where you're staying, in case there's a problem with cell phones.

Take an ATM card with you so you can get cash if you need it. A number of institutions have connections with banks all over the US. Many of them charge fees for withdrawals, but it's one way to have access to cash most of the time.

Take road maps of the areas you expect to visit. You can often find your way by consulting a map if you can't find anyone to ask for directions.

Carry ID with you at all times. During my last trip, my parents and I were asked for drivers' licenses or other ID whenever we wanted to charge anything on a credit card. This is especially important if you're leaving the country for any length of time. If you know you're traveling to a foreign country, file the paperwork for a passport now.

Label your luggage. Labels can be purchased in various places (often where you would buy luggage -- convenient, no? :wink: ) The tags should list your name, address, and a contact phone number in case the bag is misplaced or you turn up missing. At the very least, write the information on a slip of paper and stick it in the bag somewhere where it won't get lost.

Travel-sized items such as toothpaste and aspirin are available in many stories, including Wal-Mart. It's easier than hauling the full-sized stuff around.

If you want good places to eat, ask the hotel clerk or a store clerk where s/he would take his/her family to eat for a reasonable price. You'll often find really good local restaurants you wouldn't otherwise try.

Look for hotels that offer breakfast included in your room rate. You can save some money that way, and the food is fresh each morning. Most hotels that do that will offer an array of foods, so finding something you like for breakfast isn't difficult.
 

Void.M

Well-Known Member
Don't live off of fast food. Stop at a proper restaurant every so often (Even a Denny's or IHOP is better than McDonald's) otherwise prepare to be sick.


Yeah, That sounds about right.

dennys 24/7 breakfast rocks
 
Last edited:

Caduceus

The Original Muffins Man
Leave a general list of expected stops, or at least the expected arrival time at a final destination, with someone trustworthy at home. Admittedly, you may not make those stops at exactly those times, but it's a good idea to make sure someone knows where you're supposed to be at least part of the time. Make sure that person has the names and phone numbers of everyone in the party. Call them if there are any major changes in your trip.

When you arrive, you might want to call home and leave the number of the hotel where you're staying, in case there's a problem with cell phones.

Take an ATM card with you so you can get cash if you need it. A number of institutions have connections with banks all over the US. Many of them charge fees for withdrawals, but it's one way to have access to cash most of the time.

Take road maps of the areas you expect to visit. You can often find your way by consulting a map if you can't find anyone to ask for directions.

Carry ID with you at all times. During my last trip, my parents and I were asked for drivers' licenses or other ID whenever we wanted to charge anything on a credit card. This is especially important if you're leaving the country for any length of time. If you know you're traveling to a foreign country, file the paperwork for a passport now.

Label your luggage. Labels can be purchased in various places (often where you would buy luggage -- convenient, no? :wink: ) The tags should list your name, address, and a contact phone number in case the bag is misplaced or you turn up missing. At the very least, write the information on a slip of paper and stick it in the bag somewhere where it won't get lost.

Travel-sized items such as toothpaste and aspirin are available in many stories, including Wal-Mart. It's easier than hauling the full-sized stuff around.

If you want good places to eat, ask the hotel clerk or a store clerk where s/he would take his/her family to eat for a reasonable price. You'll often find really good local restaurants you wouldn't otherwise try.

Look for hotels that offer breakfast included in your room rate. You can save some money that way, and the food is fresh each morning. Most hotels that do that will offer an array of foods, so finding something you like for breakfast isn't difficult.
Seldes knows where its at.
 

Dr.Strangefate

He Sees You When You're Sleeping. He Knows When Yo
Me and some college friends are making a trip from Milwaukee (where my car lives) to California (to pick up my friend Elena) then drive all the way to New York City (where we go to school) over our Spring Break.

So yeah... good thread.

And Seldes kicks all kinds of ***.
 

Seldes Katne

Site mom
Seldes has been traveling somewhere pretty much every year since 1975. I may be slow, but I do eventually learn a few things. :D

If you're going to do any amount of traveling, you might want to join the Automobile Association of America (AAA). You get free maps, free travel planning, at least one free tow each year if you have car trouble, and discounts on a lot of hotels, car rentals, and other travel-related services. Fees are $40 - $50 a year for Standard Membership and $39 for Associate Membership. (Check the closest AAA office to you to find out what the actual fees are and what the memberships entail.)
 

moonmaster

Without him, all of you would be lost souls roamin
This reminds me of when my family used to take road trips every summer. We don't do it anymore, but it was certainly fun when we did.
Don't pick up hitchhikers.
But...

Who will you torture and kill?
Don't spend the night in any haunted mansions or camp near a lake where many people have been mysteriously murdered.
Don't stop in any small towns in the middle of the country. And if - under any circumstances - you hear a chainsaw, run like hell.
Gothamite and I and some of our respective friends are trying to go Eurorailing this summer. Any tips for that too?
Don't stop at any-, I mean do stop at any and all hostels.
 

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