The physics of Gah Lak Tus

E

Moderator
Excelsior Club
Joined
May 17, 2004
Messages
33,346
Location
MI
I'm no science guy, but I was just wondering, if Gah Lak Tus is a group of robots 100,000 miles long and not one solid mass, would it still have a collective gravity like was suggested by Reed in Ultimate Extinction #1? How is that possible?
 

Ultimate Houde

UC's Resident Genetic Recombinator
Joined
Apr 14, 2005
Messages
20,134
Location
Houde's Chili Dog Shack
Depends on how big the ships are, how close the are together, and how they interact. If they move as one, then it is probable

Think of it this way, the Earth is nothing more than trillions and trillions grains of sand, each interacting with each other, causing gravitational forces, and magnectic fields to keep them all together.

Hopefully, that example explained it.
 

Random

Didn't **** any of those *****es
Joined
Jun 16, 2005
Messages
13,680
Location
Philadelphia, PA
E said:
I'm no science guy, but I was just wondering, if Gah Lak Tus is a group of robots 100,000 miles long and not one solid mass, would it still have a collective gravity like was suggested by Reed in Ultimate Extinction #1? How is that possible?
Every object in the universe has gravity. Anything that has matter. The way gravity is explain is that the earth pulls on you and you also pull on the earth, but since you are significantly smaller it doesn't effect the earth at all. And if the robots have an appropriate mass to them then yes they would have gravity.
 
Last edited:

Ice

Teh Sexy Monkey Queen
Joined
Jul 24, 2004
Messages
43,800
Location
The World of Icelandia.
Random said:
Every object in the universe has gravity. Anything that has matter. The way gravity is explain is that the earth pulls on you and you also pull on the earth, but since you are significantly smaller it doesn't effect the earth at all. And if the robots have an appropriate mass to them then yes they would have gravity.
I understood this better than Houde's. :p



:lol:
 

E.Vi.L.

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2005
Messages
1,276
Location
Montréal
As I understand it, each robot has its own gravity.

They all pull each at other, so they would largely cancel each other. I guess they'd have a collective and detectable gravity field, but it couldn't be much stronger than that of an asteroid belt.

Should Earth send a spaceship toward Gah Lak Tus, the gravity would be mostly negligible when plotting an approach course and when considering the amount of energy required to leave its gravity field. IMO, anyway.
 

Bass

Nexus of the World
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
14,167
Location
Folkestone, UK
Actually, when E posed the question, I thought, "Well, essentially, the Earth is a bunch of molecules all next to each other. At the galaxy is many stars. If there were enough in close proximity, they'd create gravity."

Which is what Houde said. Makes perfect sense to me. :)
 

Random

Didn't **** any of those *****es
Joined
Jun 16, 2005
Messages
13,680
Location
Philadelphia, PA
jtg3885 said:
Where's that picture of a bunny with the pancake on his head when you really need it?
yuebing_rabbit-786860.jpg
 

E

Moderator
Excelsior Club
Joined
May 17, 2004
Messages
33,346
Location
MI
E.Vi.L. said:
As I understand it, each robot has its own gravity.

They all pull each at other, so they would largely cancel each other. I guess they'd have a collective and detectable gravity field, but it couldn't be much stronger than that of an asteroid belt.

Yeah, so would it be enough to start ripping buildings apart?

They aren't that big - what are they, 30 feet? I can't remember where that was said but I'm pretty sure it was.
 

Nurhachi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2004
Messages
3,419
Location
New Zealand
Well E, to answer your question, it depends on the rotation of the parameter on Gah Lak Tus's axis of its orbit. Comparing its size, density and location of squirrels to the Earths continuim quantum frequency. Take into consideration the probability of mass radiation transmorphication and the formation of cosmic dangles. This could play a huge part in the gravitational output.


Taking all this into account, the answer to your question is, in fact, Eleven.
 

Random

Didn't **** any of those *****es
Joined
Jun 16, 2005
Messages
13,680
Location
Philadelphia, PA
E said:
Yeah, so would it be enough to start ripping buildings apart?

They aren't that big - what are they, 30 feet? I can't remember where that was said but I'm pretty sure it was.
Well I guess so, something 100,000 miles long, depending on the density it does seem possible, but I doubt it. I thinkn they just heard that gravity is equal to the amount of mass and ran with it.
 

ProjectX2

Don't expect me to take you with me when I go to s
Joined
Sep 15, 2004
Messages
25,007
Nurhachi said:
Well E, to answer your question, it depends on the rotation of the parameter on Gah Lak Tus's axis of its orbit. Comparing its size, density and location of squirrels to the Earths continuim quantum frequency. Take into consideration the probability of mass radiation transmorphication and the formation of cosmic dangles. This could play a huge part in the gravitational output.


Taking all this into account, the answer to your question is, in fact, Eleven.

It's actually seventeen, you forgot to add the duey decimal system.
 

Random

Didn't **** any of those *****es
Joined
Jun 16, 2005
Messages
13,680
Location
Philadelphia, PA
ProjectX2 said:
It's actually seventeen, you forgot to add the duey decimal system.
I thought it was 42? Maybe I should check my math, but I'm pretty sure the answer is 42.
 

ProjectX2

Don't expect me to take you with me when I go to s
Joined
Sep 15, 2004
Messages
25,007
Random said:
I thought it was 42? Maybe I should check my math, but I'm pretty sure the answer is 42.

If HHGG was good for anything, it was telling me that 42 is the answer to EVERYTHING.

It's also one of the six numbers in Lost.
 

Ultimate Houde

UC's Resident Genetic Recombinator
Joined
Apr 14, 2005
Messages
20,134
Location
Houde's Chili Dog Shack
Bass said:
Actually, when E posed the question, I thought, "Well, essentially, the Earth is a bunch of molecules all next to each other. At the galaxy is many stars. If there were enough in close proximity, they'd create gravity."

Which is what Houde said. Makes perfect sense to me. :)

It's cause we are both smart

And Mooney, I'm the mad scientist, you're simply loco
 

Lynx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
4,489
Location
Orlando, FL
DIrishB said:
This entire thread is strangely reminiscent of public education in America. Go U.S. of A. Whoo-hoo!

Because you learn nothing?

Or because you learn everything at a slower rate then the rest of the world?
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top