DreamMovie #10 "Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You..."

bluebeast

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Aug 3, 2005
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KCK
... or "I have a dream!"

... or "Four score and seven years ago."

... or "Leaders aren't born, they're made."

... or whomever else you so wish it.

CREATE A BIOPIC BASED ON THE LIFE OF ANYONE YOU WANT.​

THE RULES

1. The winner of this round becomes the moderator of the next round and gets to choose the subject for the next round. Winner may also declare whether it is animated or a live-action.

2. You may use actors who have played a role before, but only if you're creating a new plot.

3. After the declared time period, the round will be declared closed and people may vote via PM to the moderator, who will declare a winner. Like the Ultimatization Game, you CANNOT vote for yourself.

Have fun with this one. I want to have a lot of participation in this round because these rounds have been pretty lax lately. I better get one from you Moony, you suggested it.
 

moonmaster

Without him, all of you would be lost souls roamin
Joined
Feb 23, 2005
Messages
13,670
Oh, I'll be contributing.

I'm doing the definitive Beatles biopic.

Marvelman has already given me some help with casting the Beatles (And when I say "help", I mean I took all of his suggestions for all of them.)
 

ourchair

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Feb 16, 2005
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13,105
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Philippines
... or "I have a dream!"

... or "Four score and seven years ago."

... or "Leaders aren't born, they're made."

... or whomever else you so wish it.

CREATE A BIOPIC BASED ON THE LIFE OF ANYONE YOU WANT.​



Have fun with this one. I want to have a lot of participation in this round because these rounds have been pretty lax lately. I better get one from you Moony, you suggested it.
Search for Disney and compound wins.
 

Entropy

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Joined
May 23, 2005
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North of the equator
PHILIP K. DICK: THE MUSICAL
(EVEN THOUGH NO SONGS WILL BE SUNG)

Prepare to be stabbed in the mind with a mental icepick.
 

moonmaster

Without him, all of you would be lost souls roamin
Joined
Feb 23, 2005
Messages
13,670
PHILIP K. DICK: THE MUSICAL
(EVEN THOUGH NO SONGS WILL BE SUNG)

Prepare to be stabbed in the mind with a mental icepick.
YES!!!

If I wasn't so Beatles crazy lately, I would've decapitated you and stolen this idea. I've been thinking about how to do an ultra-surreal Philip K. Dick biopic for a long time.

If there's anyone who has a life worthy of film dramatization, it's Dick.
 

Zombipanda

My Boom-Boom's mostly gay
Joined
Jan 31, 2006
Messages
9,401
Location
Zoo Atlanta
PHILIP K. DICK: THE MUSICAL
(EVEN THOUGH NO SONGS WILL BE SUNG)

Prepare to be stabbed in the mind with a mental icepick.

:rockon: :rockon: :rockon:

directed by David Cronenberg. **** yeah. **** yeah. I would happily shoot the whole movie in my neighborhood.
 

ProjectX2

Don't expect me to take you with me when I go to s
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Sep 15, 2004
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25,007
I want to do Karl Pilkington but only Karl Pilkington could play Karl Pilkington and no one even knows who Karl Pilkington is.
 

compound

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Feb 28, 2005
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2,772
Location
Metro Manila, Philippines
Old Bill
Being the Amazing Journeys and Stunning Rise of William H. Taft

Old Bill focuses on William Howard Taft's decade of diplomatic missions across the globe, as overseas Governor and Secretary of War, during the first years of the 20th century, immediately preceding his successful bid for the Presidency in 1908.

Taft is characterized as a likeable, jovial but dedicated statesman, who represents America's imperial aspirations, during the era: at once well-meaning and sincere, but also somewhat paternalistic, and capable of gross ignorance towards the needs and desires of the native people of the lands he visits. Taft is the ultimate "good cop": friendly, accommodating, but with an unwavering faith in the correctness of the rule of law.

Basically, he represents the best and worst qualities of America, at the turn of the century. Moreover, he embodies the hopes, dreams, and outlook of an America that was just beginning to assert itself as a player in the world's political scene, just as Victorian England starts coming apart under the weight of its own excesses.

Taft's journeys are framed as a kind of Odyssey-like quest towards the White House, with each colorful new locale presented in a way that suggests how America might have perceived it to be, during that era.

Ironically, to achieve the sense of "diplomatic whimsy" I'm aiming for, it would require the eye of a Frenchman: director Jean Pierre Jeunet, best known for movies like Le Fabuleux Destin d'Amélie Poulain and A Very Long Engagement.

I see Old Bill as being akin to Big Fish, not quite a faithful biography; more interested in shamelessly conveying one man's *impressions* of a time and place, rather than historical facts.

To achieve the mix of nuance, humor, authority, and vulnerability needed to portray Taft, I chose...

taft.jpg

comedian Drew Carey in a career-reviving dramatic turn as the future President (who coincidentally also hails from Taft's home state of Ohio). In spite of Carey's relative youthfulness, the guy is actually pushing 50 this year, making him approximately the right age to play the consular heavyweight. Just slap a puffy 'stache on him, and we're all set.

mckinley.jpg

Taft's saga begins in 1900, when President William McKinley (a stern Alan Dale) appoints Taft as the chairman of a commission to organize a civilian government in the new colony of the Philippines. Taft initially opposes the annexation of the islands and tells McKinley that his real ambition is to become a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He reluctantly accepts the appointment when McKinley suggests that he would be "the better judge for this experience."

nellie.jpg

The stress of relocation bears its toll on Taft's socialite wife Nellie (Kristin Scott Thomas, basically reprising her usual social-climber role in a fin de siecle context). However, Taft basks in the glow of the (perceived) admiration he receives from the "little brown Americans" , who eat up his grand promises of modern "civilization".

popeleo.jpg

His journey next leads him to the Vatican, where he meets aging Pope Leo XIII (the "Pope of the Working Man" and "The Social Pope", played here by sagely Sir Michael Gambon), with whom he has an interesting conversation about the relationship between religion, technology, and the government. He successfully negotiates the purchase of lands in the Philippines owned by the Roman Catholic Church.

roosevelt.jpg

In 1904, young and relatively inexperienced President Theodore Roosevelt (played with showmanship and earnest gusto by Jack Black) appoints trusted elder Taft as Secretary of War.

meiji.jpg

In this new role, Taft meets with the Meiji Emperor of Japan (characterized as an inscrutable warrior by Cary Hiroyuki Tagawa), who alerts him of the probability of war with Russia.

In 1906, Roosevelt sends troops to restore order in Cuba during the revolt led by General Enrique Loynaz del Castillo (portrayed with vicious glee by Danny Trejo), and Taft temporarily becomes the Civil Governor of Cuba, personally negotiating with General Castillo for a peaceful end to the revolt.

In 1907, Secretary Taft helps supervise the beginning of construction on the Panama Canal, in a majestic set piece highlighting the spectacle of modern engineering.

All of this leads up to "Old Bill's" victorious Presidential campaign in 1908.
 
Last edited:

SSJmole

Face-Punching As Foreign Policy
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Aug 16, 2005
Messages
19,091
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UK
It’s a kind of magic.
The Freddie Mercury Story.

Born Farrokh Bulsara in Stone Town just off the coast of Tanzania. His parents were Parsis. No one could have predicted that Farrokh or as he would later be known Freddie Mercury would change music forever and inspire a generation to follow.

The story follows Farrokh as he goes to boarding school Panchgani. Here the magic begins as we start see he is destined for greatness in the musical industry when he forms a band called The Hectics. He also starts to use the name Freddie Mercury.

He would however have to leave his home of Zanzibar due to the Zanzibar revolution. His family moved to London, England. Freddie joined Isleworth Polytechnic as an art student. He did very well and even earned a Diploma in Art and Graphic Design.

After collage Freddie really wanted to continue with music and tried a variety of different bands. He was working at the time as a Market seller and at Heathrow airport. His determination and pure passion for music would continue to push him and push him forward. In hope of one day reaching his goal of been a famous musician.

April of 1970, A day that will forever go down in history. This is when Freddie joined Brian May and Roger Taylor to form Queen. And this is when the story truly takes off. This is the start of something much , much bigger…….

Join the film as we see Freddie deal with his homosexuality and even struggling with HIV, a disease that would lead to his death in 1991. If you watch any music film this year, Make it this as it is the rise and eventually death of a true hero and a true musical Icon.



Cast:

Young Freddie Mercury – Joey Gaydos Jr.
– I picked him from School of Rock, While I may not have liked the film I wanted a kid with musical experience to play young Freddie in school when he formed his first band,


Freddie Mercury – Joseph Fiennes – A bit of an unknown which I wanted as it is important you believe he is Freddie Mercury. I picked someone who was of a different ethnic background as Freddie did not look ethnic. He even kept it hidden for awhile. I honestly think though he could play Freddie in this film.


Brian May – Rhys Ifans – I love this actor and think he is suited for the guitarist. I think he is someone you would buy as a band member. This is important to the film and in all honesty adds to the film.


Roger Meddows-Taylor – Simon Pegg – While he is best seen in comedic roles I think he could pull off a serious role but also his name is big enough to draw attention to the film which is important while it would sell based on it been about Freddie it would still help.


Note : All Queen music will be actual queen songs with the actors lip-synching and miming the actions.
 

ourchair

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2005
Messages
13,105
Location
Philippines
Old Bill
Being the Amazing Journeys and Stunning Rise of William H. Taft

Old Bill focuses on William Howard Taft's decade of diplomatic missions across the globe, as overseas Governor and Secretary of War, during the first years of the 20th century, immediately preceding his successful bid for the Presidency in 1908.

Taft is characterized as a likeable, jovial but dedicated statesman, who represents America's imperial aspirations, during the era: at once well-meaning and sincere, but also somewhat paternalistic, and capable of gross ignorance towards the needs and desires of the native people of the lands he visits. Taft is the ultimate "good cop": friendly, accommodating, but with an unwavering faith in the correctness of the rule of law.

Basically, he represents the best and worst qualities of America, at the turn of the century. Moreover, he embodies the hopes, dreams, and outlook of an America that was just beginning to assert itself as a player in the world's political scene, just as Victorian England starts coming apart under the weight of its own excesses.

Taft's journeys are framed as a kind of Odyssey-like quest towards the White House, with each colorful new locale presented in a way that suggests how America might have perceived it to be, during that era.

Ironically, to achieve the sense of "diplomatic whimsy" I'm aiming for, it would require the eye of a Frenchman: director Jean Pierre Jeunet, best known for movies like Le Fabuleux Destin d'Amélie Poulain and A Very Long Engagement.

I see Old Bill as being akin to Big Fish, not quite a faithful biography; more interested in shamelessly conveying one man's *impressions* of a time and place, rather than historical facts.

To achieve the mix of nuance, humor, authority, and vulnerability needed to portray Taft, I chose...

taft.jpg

comedian Drew Carey in a career-reviving dramatic turn as the future President (who coincidentally also hails from Taft's home state of Ohio). In spite of Carey's relative youthfulness, the guy is actually pushing 50 this year, making him approximately the right age to play the consular heavyweight. Just slap a puffy 'stache on him, and we're all set.

mckinley.jpg

Taft's saga begins in 1900, when President William McKinley (a stern Alan Dale) appoints Taft as the chairman of a commission to organize a civilian government in the new colony of the Philippines. Taft initially opposes the annexation of the islands and tells McKinley that his real ambition is to become a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He reluctantly accepts the appointment when McKinley suggests that he would be "the better judge for this experience."

nellie.jpg

The stress of relocation bears its toll on Taft's socialite wife Nellie (Kristin Scott Thomas, basically reprising her usual social-climber role in a fin de siecle context). However, Taft basks in the glow of the (perceived) admiration he receives from the "little brown Americans" , who eat up his grand promises of modern "civilization".

popeleo.jpg

His journey next leads him to the Vatican, where he meets aging Pope Leo XIII (the "Pope of the Working Man" and "The Social Pope", played here by sagely Sir Michael Gambon), with whom he has an interesting conversation about the relationship between religion, technology, and the government. He successfully negotiates the purchase of lands in the Philippines owned by the Roman Catholic Church.

roosevelt.jpg

In 1904, young and relatively inexperienced President Theodore Roosevelt (played with showmanship and earnest gusto by Jack Black) appoints trusted elder Taft as Secretary of War.

meiji.jpg

In this new role, Taft meets with the Meiji Emperor of Japan (characterized as an inscrutable warrior by Cary Hiroyuki Tagawa), who alerts him of the probability of war with Russia.

In 1906, Roosevelt sends troops to restore order in Cuba during the revolt led by General Enrique Loynaz del Castillo (portrayed with vicious glee by Danny Trejo), and Taft temporarily becomes the Civil Governor of Cuba, personally negotiating with General Castillo for a peaceful end to the revolt.

In 1907, Secretary Taft helps supervise the beginning of construction on the Panama Canal, in a majestic set piece highlighting the spectacle of modern engineering.

All of this leads up to "Old Bill's" victorious Presidential campaign in 1908.
By the Blasted Taft of TOG!!!! This is excellent!

Jack Black as Roosevelt and Alan Dale as McKinley are ****ing awesome choices.

However, I think Pope Leo XIII should be played by the charismatic Peter Coyote, enigmatically ruthless federal agent from FOX's short-lived The Inside and the sinister cover-up man from The 4400.
 

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